Piping

Piping is the ability to use and display a panelist’s prior responses in the course of a survey. If you want to pipe in data, it must be written in a specific way.

How to Pipe Data

Market researchers often want survey participants to respond to a question while thinking about something they "said" (that is, answered) earlier. While programming a survey, you can think of piped-in data as a reference to anything that came earlier in the survey. 

Once a question has been answered, you can pipe that information back into your MFourDIY™  survey at any subsequent point. To do this, you must write the data using the “{“and“}”  symbols on your keyboard. These are called curly brackets. They will be used to bracket the information you want piped into your question.

Piping: Previous Response

{QID}

The text between the curly brackets is the Question ID for the item from which you want to pipe data.

Example: 

Back on Question 2, you said your favorite type of beverage was {Q2}. How often per week do you drink it? 

How it would appear: 

Back on Question 2, you said your favorite type of beverage was coffee. How often per week do you drink it?

Piping: Previous Response from Multiple Selection

 {QID:and}

The text for "QID" will be replaced with the Question ID for the item from which you want to pipe data. The phrase "and" can be replaced with any word you want to use for separating the multiple selection responses. (For instance, you may use “or” if you limit the answer choices to two selections).

Example: 

Back on Question 3, you said your most-watched TV channels were {Q3:and}. Of these, which is your favorite?

How it would appear: 

Back on Question 3, you said your most-watched TV channels were Discovery Channel, ESPN, History Channel, and Lifetime. Of these, which is your favorite?

 

Piping: Previous Response from Ranked Order

{QID:1}

The text for "QID" will be replaced with the Question ID for the item from which you want to pipe data. The number will be replaced and indicates which choice you want displayed from a ranked order, with 0 representing respondents’ first choice, and 1 the second choice. If you used {QID:1} as shown above, you would be piping in the second choice.

Example: 

On Question 4 you were asked to rank ice cream flavors in order of preference. You said that {Q4:1} was your second favorite. What makes {Q4:0} a better flavor?

How it would appear: 

On Question 4 you were asked to rank ice cream flavors in order of preference. You said that vanilla was your second favorite. What makes chocolate a better flavor?

Location Piping


Location Name

{LOCATION}

In a location-based survey, writing the word “LOCATION” between curly brackets will pipe in the name of the specific location (drawn from the location group) where a panelist is taking the survey.

Example: 

You're currently in the {LOCATION}. Please proceed to the grocery department. 

How it would appear: 

You're currently in the Costa Mesa Target. Please proceed to the grocery department.

Location Group Name

{LOCATIONGROUP}

In a location-based survey, writing “LOCATIONGROUP” between curly brackets will pipe in the name of the location group where the panelist is taking the survey . 

Example: 

You're currently in the {LOCATIONGROUP}. Please proceed to the grocery department.

How it would appear: 

You're currently in the Target. Please proceed to the grocery department. 

Arrival Time

{ARRIVED}

In a location-based survey, writing “ARRIVED” between curly brackets will pipe in the time when the panelist reached the survey location.. 

Example: 

When you arrived at the store at {ARRIVED}, how many checkout registers were open?

How it would appear: 

When you arrived at the store at 9:35 a.m., how many checkout registers were open?

Departure Time

{DEPARTED}

In a location-based survey, writing “DEPARTED” between curly brackets will pipe in the time when a panelist left the location in the survey.

Example: 

When you left the store at {DEPARTED}, how many employees did you see collecting carts?

How it would appear: 

When you left the store at 10:05 a.m., how many employees did you see collecting carts?